ES Magazine

In this week’s ES Magazine (2nd Feb 2017), Anna Bu Kliewer creates new collage pieces to accompany their feature

In this week’s ES Magazine (2nd Feb 2017), Anna Bu Kliewer creates new collage pieces to accompany their feature.

Article Mag Anna Bu Website

Article

Anna Bu Kliewer creates a visual for the current issue of Article, Issue 8 and their feature – How My Light

Anna Bu Kliewer creates a visual for the current issue of Article, Issue 8 and their feature – How My Light

‘A room full or bored schoolboys is an unlikely place to seek redemption. But in this bittersweet short story, the end of an English teacher’s marriage is pitched against a combination of cricket, classroom banter and poetry.’

To read in full pick up a copy of the current issue.

Words by Samuel Fisher

Creative Director Kenny Ho

Article

 

 

 

Soft Men

New form Anna Bu Kliewer

Soft Men – Portraits of sensitive men who stand in contrast to common social gender ideas.

New from Anna Bu Kliewer

Soft MenBlue, Green and Beige. Portraits of sensitive men who stand in contrast to common social gender ideas.

Modern Mermaids

Anna Bu Kliewer has just produced some new work with a distinct aquatic theme

Anna Bu Kliewer has just produced some new work with a distinct aquatic theme. Albeit set on dry land. Perhaps its best to let Anna explain in her own words.

Modern Mermaids

Mermaids have legs nowadays. They like to live in colourful climates and wear the current ocean trends.

They’re very proud of their new legs. And love to show them off in heels. Though this is really because they dislike getting sand between their toes.

They remain quite shy creatures, still refusing to come out of their shell. Or their anenome.

Let’s just enjoy seeing them explore colour in their new pastel landscape and support them in their ambition to one day meet Crockett and Tubbs.

 

ES Magazine

Anna Bu Kliewer creates visuals to accompany a piece by Hannah Betts called ‘Letters to my Exes’ for ES Magazine.

Anna Bu Kliewer creates visuals to accompany a piece by Hannah Betts called ‘Letters to my Exes’ for ES Magazine.

See the start of Hannah’s article here and Anna Bu’s illustrations below. To read in full visit ES Magazine, online.

Last summer, my mother died. This would be challenging enough, but ours had been a turbulent relationship. For almost a decade, she had refused any contact. This continued until my early 40s, after which communication resumed. There was no apology and no discussion. That first Christmas back in her company was the Christmas of her cancer diagnosis. Six months later, she was dead.

Despite having close siblings, the greatest of friends, and a loving partner, only Tom, the ex-boyfriend who had been by my side during the ‘cold shoulder’ years, could fully understand my agonies. I could try to explain it to other people, but I didn’t need to explain it to him, and the relief of being understood without saying a word was seismic. I love the man and always will.

And it’s not just me. Ex-love is a new, tribal phenomenon, especially in London, that great single stalking ground in which exes never disappear. In an Office for National Statistics survey, seven of the country’s top 10 most single areas were discovered to be in the capital. London boasts legions of single people, who tend not to settle down until later, if at all, giving our ex potential more scope. 

A year in collage

To celebrate her first year with Breed, we asked Anna Bu Kliewer what she’s been up to, and she replied with a verbal collage – A year in collage

To celebrate her first year with Breed, we asked Anna Bu Kliewer what she’s been up to, and she replied with a verbal collage – A year in collage

A space in London

For the first few months after returning to London I was moving house almost every month. Then, in January I found a permanent home in Haggerston. It’s ideal because it provides me with a large area to work, and collage requires a lot of space. I usually work across two desks, at least at first, though it’s never long before I’ve covered the entire floor with paper, too.

Haggerston inspires me

I have a constant urge to create new pieces, find new images, and to source paper I can cut. I couldn’t be in a better base than Haggerston, really. The area is like a random collage in itself, as it’s so busy and filled with interesting people and weird objects. I find simply walking around offers me constant visual input, it’s an endless inspiration. When I get home after a wander I’m always full of ideas. And often laden with lots of new material I’ve picked up from all the local thrift shops and markets, too.

Parrot love

Yesterday I met a beautiful three-legged cat. While I was petting her a man passing by started talking to me. On his shoulder sat a parrot who kept giving him kisses. I love these moments.

New focus

I’m taking photographs again. Mostly digital at the moment, though I just bought ten rolls of film that I’m going to use over the next couple of months. It allows you to shift focus on how you see things, becoming more aware of what you’d normally ignore as mundane objects, and capturing moments. Collage and photography go hand-in-hand as disciplines, too, and I intend to use the photos in future collage works.

A to Z

An ongoing project I’m working on is an alphabet I’m creating from little collage pieces. I find typography challenging in the most positive sense, since I’m restricted by the cuts of paper I have to hand. It takes a long time to find the right shapes and colours and put them together to form a letter.

Moving images

I’ve also started two series, one a collage animation, the other video collage. Both began as analogue projects, but have now entered their digital stage. I’m intending to finish both of them this summer, and I really can’t wait to share them.

Illustrating AA Gill

The most exciting commission I’ve had so far is probably the first one I got when I joined Breed last September. It was for an AA Gill feature in The Sunday Times Magazine. That was a pretty good start.

A new discipline

I’ve discovered that I really enjoy working with a brief. Visualising words, and creating a pictorial version of the story is fun, especially because my clients give me a lot of freedom, and trust in my creative process and interpretation. Plus, working on editorial pieces has taught me to rely on my ability, as the tight deadlines stop you from overthinking and you have no choice but to trust your intuition.

I dont watch clocks

Being an illustrator is not a Monday-to-Friday 9-5 job. You work long and strange hours. Though that’s not necessarily a negative, as it also gives you more flexibility in your personal life, which is something I really appreciate.

No ties

I can do my work anywhere, as long as I have my suitcase full of paper, scissors and glue with me. And that means I can travel and still work.

Returning to Cape Town

The flexibility my work gives me meant I was able to spend April back in Cape Town. It was lovely to be in the sunshine and to see my friends again. And the beautiful landscapes of Cape Town are always an inspiration.

A sense of freedom

I find changing my surroundings once in a while is very useful for my creative process. That’s my excuse, anyway. Travels are adventures for the mind, eyes, nose, ears and taste-buds.

Travelling in my head

My travelling experiences can then be translated into visual works, taking my surroundings in and abstracting them in your mind. Not that I have to go anywhere – even looking at images in the books I find can be a vacation. You are traveling to places mentally.

Bastille birthday

This summer I’m planning to travel through Europe, including Germany, France and the Netherlands. And the thing I’m most excited about is celebrating my birthday in Paris.

Portraits and details shot by Cat Garcia.

Female Flaneurs, Hold Me and Puff Plasters

Three new sections of work from Anna Bu Kliewer; Female Flaneurs, Hold Me and Puff Plasters.

Three new sections of work from Anna Bu Kliewer; Female Flaneurs, Hold Me and Puff Plasters.

Female Flaneurs:

Inspired by her love of walking everywhere, the collages explore the importance of legs for flaneurism and depict these female body parts in a sensual manner.

Hold Me:

A series on men in their urban, mundane existence. They are holding onto their dreams and desires, an escapism from reality and loneliness. These works create new, absurd psychological and emotional spaces.

Puff Plasters:

These portraits show nicotine addiction and how smoking begins to consume more and more of our personality and appearance.

ES Magazine

Anna Bu Kliewer creates an a visual for ES Magazine and their feature ‘Smashing Bumpkins. Sworn urbanite or country nut? No need to choose – the shire have had a chic makeover, say Samuel Fishwick’

Anna Bu Kliewer creates an a visual for ES Magazine and their feature Smashing Bumpkins. Sworn urbanite or country nut? No need to choose – the shires have had a chic makeover, say Samuel Fishwick’

Issue : 12th May 2016

Art Director: Rasha Kahil

Exteriors and Silent Housing

Two new series of work from Anna Bu Kliewer

Two new series of work from Anna Bu Kliewer. The first series Exteriors, explores the persona one can feel once certain items are put onto the body.

A transformation of attitude, covering or showing off the inner self. A playful merge with shapes and feminine embodiment.

The second series is Silent Housing.  These show still and quiet depictions of domestic lives and the contrast to life in nature.

All hinting on a housewife’s imagination and ideas of a scenario outside their daily routine, where they transform into a surreal fantasy.

Esquire The Big Black Book – Spring/Summer 2016

Imagery by Anna Bu Kliewer for Esquire and The Big Black Book, to accompany their ‘All Eyes On Us’ feature by Glenn O’Brien. The changing landscape of American style.

Imagery by Anna Bu Kliewer for Esquire and The Big Black Book, to accompany their ‘All Eyes On Us’ feature by Glenn O’Brien. The changing landscape of American style.

Spring/Summer 2016

Creative Direction by B.A.M.

ES Magazine

Anna creates illustrations for the new Evening Standard Magazine and their feature with Will Self.

Anna Bu Kliewer creates illustrations for the new ES Magazine and their feature with Will Self.

King of the Road. A committed urban explorer, Will Self has spent years walking out of London into the countryside beyond. In the feature he reveals how traversing the capital has mapped the city and his heart’.

Cloud Nine, Shipping and Burnt Flame

A new series from Anna Bu Kliewer and her take on the recurrence of battle throughout history, merging the faded past with a coloured present.

The three pieces are entitled Cloud Nine, Shipping and Burnt Flame.

A new series from Anna Bu Kliewer and her take on the recurrence of battle throughout history, merging the faded past with a coloured present.

The three pieces are entitled Cloud Nine, Shipping and Burnt Flame.

The Sunday Times Magazine – AA Gill

Anna Bu Kliewer creates a series of illustrations for The Sunday Times Magazine and their feature on AA Gill and his new memoir.

Anna Bu Kliewer creates a series of illustrations for The Sunday Times Magazine and their feature on AA Gill, discussing his new memoir.

AA Gill:  ‘Drunks’ dreams are never a pretty relaxed place… I knew all about hallucination’

To see more go to The Sunday Times Magazine

When asking Anna Bu on her visual interpretation, here is what she had to say:

‘The works play on the hallucinatory consciousness – a twilight zone that exists somewhere between the paranoid imagination and the dreamer’s anxious reality. Here scattered experiences merge – some in harmony, some in discord – into a purgatorial experience where the dreamworld projects outwards into reality… or perhaps it is reality that projects inward.’

Art Direction: Matt Curtis

Getting to know Anna

Breed talks to the latest artist to join the agency, Anna Bu Kliewer.

We talk to the latest artist to join Breed, Anna Bu Kliewer.

1. You’ve lived all over the world, why have you decided to return to London?

As much as I loved living in Cape Town, I began to miss Europe. It seemed like the right time to go back to London. I like the feel of a big city. It’s somewhat unpredictable, similar to my working process. The visual input you get is immense, and I love London’s vibrancy, of people, culture, art and music. It has so many different areas, all so close together, yet with a different history and feel, which I appreciate.

And after you’ve lived in Vancouver for over a year, you laugh about the little bit of rain here.

2. How did you hear about Breed, and what attracted to join their books?

I was following their Instagram account as I really liked the imagery, and their great, diverse artists, when they contacted me. I was really new to this, so unsure what to expect, but hearing that someone liked my work was a wonderful feeling. I was familiar with the agency environment as I used to model in my early 20s to pay for uni. From that experience I knew that boutique agencies have a more personal approach, which is very important for me.
Loving an agency’s work is a starting point, but if you join their books it becomes about the relationship with the people you’ll be working with. And when I met with Breed for the first time it was a lovely experience, and we communicated well, which is key for a productive relationship.

3. You work with both analogue and digital mediums, how do you feel the two complement each other, especially in your work?

Every piece starts off analogue, as I love the process of sourcing and cutting. It’s hands on and can be quite addictive. Maybe it’s down to a sense of nostalgia that I still enjoy using basic tools like scissors and glue in our digital world. Then the digital comes in – all the cut-out pieces are scanned in and stored in my ‘paper library’. Digital can be a great tool for patterns, layering and resizing. Both mediums are important for my work and I appreciate their differences.

4. Where did you study and what did you study? Do you think it made an impact on your chosen art form?

I studied Fine Art at Emily Carr University in Vancouver, Canada and Central Saint Martins in London. When I first started I thought I would become a painter, but soon realised that I enjoy all other mediums way more. I started focussing on both still and moving imagery, spent days in the darkroom and editing video footage. It had a massive impact on me and my work. I have learned to follow my intuition and be driven by my curiosity.

5. Has the time you spent travelling influenced your style?

It certainly did, although in a more subconscious way. I think that everyone gets influenced by their surroundings in various ways. It can be an article in a newspaper, a song, a conversation or a stranger in the street. Whatever stimulation it is, it affects and helps us in the way we approach things. I once saw a granny on the streets of New York, dressed in pink on a little pink bicycle – what colour do you think I used in the next collage I made? But it is not just what you are seeing or hearing, it can also be a feeling that influences your work. If I am moody, I tend to use more subtle colours in my work.

6. When did you first start making collages – what was it that attracted you to this medium?

The first time I made collages was in art classes in high school. We were forced to do it and everyone rolled their eyes. But then I spent a lot of time at home putting far more work into the project than I needed to. For me, rolling eyes turned into smiles.

Though I put it aside for a few years, I kept being drawn back to collage, and it became a tool in my creative process. Once I accepted it as a separate medium, which took a long time because an everyday item like paper is not as obvious a medium as oils and canvas, it became my favourite creative outlet. Once I got used to the cuts on my fingers, paper and I became good friends.

I think collage attracted me because it is playful and imaginative. Although you’re never sure what you might find, there’s material for it everywhere and hunting for the ‘right’ pieces is exciting. I can create any image that I imagine, it has endless possibilities.

I like approaching the mundane and transforming it into something new and absurd, filling vanished spaces, stitching them back together with a new story and meaning. Collage gives me the opportunity to explore my imagination and dreams, allowing me to keep the meaning open to interpretation. It suggests, but stays slightly blurred, leaving each viewer with different illusions. At times it can be an escape into an abstract reality where time is flattened.

8. Where do you find the inspiration for your collages? Do you find you have a recurring theme?

As I usually don’t know what I am creating at the beginning, there cannot be a proper inspiration. There’s a motivation to create a story or colour, but chance is the most important aspect for me in collage. It gives me the opportunity to approach imagery in a random, unknowing way, which is liberating. I get confused by looking at similar work, so I prefer to get my inspiration from other sources, in everyday life. I do really enjoy going for walks with music, like the old idea of flânerie, taking in your surroundings in the big busy city is great and maybe another reason why I returned to London.

Recurring themes include faces and their loss of identity, the change of meaning. Faceless, mutilated humans that merge with natural objects to form surreal hybrids or people ‘stuck’ in humorous, obscure situations, intruded on by moving shapes.

9. How has your work evolved since you started… retrospectively, can you identify moments when you changed course?

The first change was when I began seeing collage as a separate medium. I became more aware of choosing and rearranging pieces, taking more time. Once it turned into creating a final paper piece and not just using it as part of the creative process, I started to place great importance on colour, and how it can blend several pieces together or contrast them.

Another evolution occurred when I got my first cutting knife. I had just been using scissors for years, so the delicate precision of a knife opened up new possibilities.

10. When you’re not at your cutting board, how do you like to spend your time?

I watch a lot of movies, TV shows and documentaries as they’re a great stimulation while cutting, but only ones without subtitles as I’ve had a bad experience with cutting my fingers while watching a French movie.
Otherwise I still surround myself with paper a lot – I like books. A lot. Ones with words not images. I love reading, but that doesn’t mean I just hide at home, as I really enjoy music and see a lot of bands, and like to be social with a glass of whiskey.

11. Lots of your work is humorous, can you tell us the funniest thing that’s happened to you recently?

I’d like to work somewhere with no gravity as I’m pretty clumsy. I drop things, I break things, or both. I even slip on banana skins (that’s right, it doesn’t only happen in cartoons). So I guess I provide more laughs for others than for myself, but I’m glad to be of humorous help to my friends and the odd random person on the street.

12. Which of your fellow Breed artists’ work most excites you?

Matt Blease’s work. Although our mediums are very different, he also has a humorous approach in a lot of his work, which I really enjoy. Hi Matt, you make nice things!