The Financial Times Weekend Magazine

James Joyce’s latest work appeared in The Financial Times Weekend Magazine on 11 Feb 2017, illustrating Douglas Coupland’s latest column.

James Joyce’s latest work appeared in The Financial Times Weekend Magazine on 11 Feb 2017, illustrating Douglas Coupland’s latest Observations column.

Moy. I have several versions of me which I know I can more or less count on depending on the situation… Everyday Doug… Serious Doug… Party Doug. But is there a single definitive Doug?’

 

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Financial Times Weekend Magazine

James Joyce illustrates again for The Financial Times Weekend Magazine and their Douglas Coupland Observations piece. Issue 21st Jan 2017.

James Joyce’s latest work appeared in The Financial Times Weekend Magazine on 21 January 2017.

It illustrated an Observations piece by Douglas Coupland on the Queen, and how she has so permeated his, and our, lives. Specifically, James has focused on Coupland’s first memory of the Queen’s image, going back to his days as a stamp collector.

The Guardian Review

James Joyce has created the cover illustration for this weekend’s (14th January 2017) Guardian Review section. Art directed by Sarah Habershon, James’s striking image perfectly captures the thrust of Pankaj Mishra’s piece on the US, ‘The Divided States’.

James Joyce has created the cover illustration for this weekend’s (14th January 2017) Guardian Review section. Art directed by Sarah Habershon, James’s striking image perfectly captures the thrust of Pankaj Mishra’s piece on the US, ‘The Divided States’.

M Le magazine du Monde

James Joyce creates two illustrations for the French magazine, M, the supplement for Le Monde newspaper.

James Joyce creates two illustrations for the French magazine, M, the supplement for Le Monde newspaper and their piece entitled – La pensée positive, une entreprise très lucrative.

Financial Times Weekend Magazine

James Joyce illustrates two images for The FT magazine and their Douglas Coupland feature.

James Joyce illustrates two images for The Financial Times Weekend Magazine and their Douglas Coupland Observations piece – ‘Nobody likes speaking on phones any more see page. When did this happen? Why did this happen?’

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M Le magazine du Monde

James Joyce has created the cover for the latest, post-American election, edition of French magazine, M, the supplement for Le Monde newspaper.

James Joyce on the triumph of Trump

James Joyce has created the cover for the latest, post-American election, edition of French magazine, M, the supplement for Le Monde newspaper.

His image, showing a fallen US flag, illustrates the magazine’s assessment in the main feature inside, which reflects on what it calls an ‘unusual campaign’.

Le Monde

The French newspaper Le Monde has commissioned James Joyce to create a series of images for a feature on the issue of ‘affirmative consent’ in the USA.

The French newspaper Le Monde has commissioned James Joyce to create a series of images for a feature on the issue of ‘affirmative consent’ in the USA.

Since 2014, in order to tackle the increase of sexual assaults on college campuses, three states (California, New York and Connecticut) passed different laws about “affirmative consent”.

These laws require universities to specify in their rules that “consent between sexual partners must be explicit, conscious and willing”. in other words silence or the absence of a no is not a yes. Only a verbal yes means yes.

James created four images with the words ‘Yes’ and ‘No’ using typography and symbolism to communicate ideas around the issue of consent.

Mama Shelter

James Joyce works again with Mama Shelter

Back in 2013 James Joyce worked with GBH London for a series of illustrations, entitled ‘Mama Loves…‘ for the rapidly growing hotel brand Mama Shelter, designed by Phillipe Starck.

These included LA, Paris, Marseille, Lyon, Bordeaux and Istanbul. The visual for Paris can be seen here.

This year he is working again with GBH London for a further five visuals; Bangkok, London, Prague, Toulouse and Lille, which we’ll be able to show you later this year.

For more info see:

Mama Shelter

KesselsKramer

James Joyce recently worked with KesselsKramer Netherlands for the Amsterdam hotel relaunch of Pulitzer.

James Joyce recently worked with KesselsKramer Netherlands for the Amsterdam hotel relaunch of Pulitzer.

The newly branded hotel has already been partially launched, with the second phase taking place later this summer, in August 2016.

We’ll show more of the work from James at this time.

James was asked to design a series of patterns to form part of the hotels identity. Each pattern is informed by the various services available in the hotel. The patterns appear traditional at first glance but on closer scrutiny many of them are made up of various everyday objects such as detergent containers, buckets, and vacuum cleaners.

Shown here are some of pattern designs that James created as part of the Pulitzer rebrand.

For more info on the hotel see Pulitzer

We talked to James about his current show at colette, Paris

100 Likes is a solo exhibition of works taking place at colette Paris from 1-27 February 2016. We talked to James Joyce about the exhibition and the pieces being exhibited:

100 Likes is a solo exhibition of works taking place at colette Paris from 1-27 February 2016.

We talked to James Joyce about the exhibition and the pieces being exhibited:

Breed:  For those who have not yet seen the exhibition, how would you define the pieces you are exhibiting?

James:  I’m exploring the idea of ‘Like’ as a defining word of the internet generation in a similar way to how ‘Love’ defined a generation in the late ‘60s and early ‘70s. It’s a comment on its rise within social media and how a previously passive word has crept into global culture and gained a certain kind of power. ‘Like’ has become more than just a word, it’s become an action, a reward and an icon. It’s now both a hugely powerful word and in many ways a meaningless one. That duality is interesting.

Breed:  Can you talk us through the process of how you created the works in the show?

James:  There are a total of 100 Likes in the show. The Like paintings are acrylic paint on canvas. Each Like panel measures 150cm x 50cm and they are grouped in various numbers. The largest painting in the show, 6 Likes, measures 300cm x 150cm. The works in the gallery upstairs are all hand screen-printed in five colour variations, limited to 40 prints of each version. There are 85 grouped together in the gallery, all hung in a grid creating a huge wall of multi-coloured ‘Likes’.

Breed:  Your Like paintings take a neutral and ambiguous position. They can be read as both a reflection of a vacuous culture defined by a word that has lost its meaning or as a celebration of ‘Like’ as a positive expression, transformed from its former passive status by its modern active context. With this in mind, do you have a personal position on social media?

James:  I’m not really criticising or championing social media. It’s complex, I can see the potential of it but it can also be very tedious. I think social media is an amazing tool in terms of the global reach it has to connect people and spread information, but it’s also profoundly vacuous in the way that a lot of people engage with it. Aside from the banalities of everyday life that many feel compelled to broadcast, there is the obsession with accumulating all of these ‘Likes’ which essentially mean nothing. It’s a currency without any tangible value. Acquiring thousands of ‘Likes’ and gaining followers isn’t a reliable barometer of whether you’re popular, talented or interesting. The repetition of large numbers of these iconic ‘Like’ paintings grouped in varying numbers perhaps highlights both the power of ‘Like’ and the emptiness of it, It looks joyful but can equally be read as cynical.

Breed:  100 Likes occupies the gallery, as well as being in and around the store. Are you pleased with how the viewer of your work can see the pieces in both a gallery and a commercial space? 

James:  The gallery is on the first floor, so it was good to be given the whole store and use the artworks to create a route through the space to the gallery upstairs. colette is a visionary store, so when you get a space as beautifully curated as this, fashion and art work well together and colette feels like an appropriate context for this exhibition.

Breed:  You also have merchandise available – any particular favourites?

James:  Yes we’ve done a few James Joyce/colette products that incorporate some of the artworks on show. I like the black-on-black collapsed face t-shirt, but we’ve also done a skateboard, scented candle, postcards, and enamel pins, all in limited editions for the duration of the show.

(Photography: Melvyn Vincent)

 

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colette

James Joyce – 100 Likes. A solo exhibition of works taking place at colette Paris from 1st – 27th February 2016.

James Joyce – 100 Likes. A solo exhibition of works taking place at colette Paris from 1st – 27th February 2016.

Shown here, ‘6 Likes’, 300cm x 150cm, acrylic on canvas.

colette

213 rue Saint-Honoré

75001 Paris

colette

If the youth of the 1960s and early 70s owned ‘Love’ as a word that summed up their generation, then perhaps it could be said that ‘Like’ is the equivalent defining word for the Internet age.

‘Like’ has become ubiquitous in recent years thanks to its use as the currency of popularity within social media platforms. In fact, it has become more than just a word; it has become an action, a reward, and an icon of sorts whereby status and ego are bolstered by the number of interactions or ‘Likes’ earned by social media users.

James Joyce’s Like paintings take a neutral and ambiguous position. They can be read as both a reflection of a vacuous culture defined by a word that has lost its meaning, endlessly and mechanically repeated, or as a celebration of ‘Like’ as a positive expression, transformed from its former passive status by its modern active context.

The title of the exhibition, ‘100 Likes’, reflects the total number of pieces included in the show, which comprises works arranged in various iterations and number groupings, appearing both as large-scale paintings and silkscreen prints.

‘100 Likes’ will occupy the gallery and first floor of the store, while other works will be exhibited on the ground floor from the 2nd until the 27th February 2016 – including five artist’s proofs of the sold-out screen-printed edition Joyce created for Banksy’s contemporary art show ‘Dismaland’. These will be on sale exclusively at colette for the duration of the exhibition.

Merchandise incorporating selected artwork will also be available in store.

AnOther Magazine A/W15 emojis

James Joyce transforms the most memorable moments from AnOther Magazine A/W15 into custom emojis.

James Joyce transforms the most memorable moments from AnOther Magazine A/W15 into custom emojis.

Words by Olivia Singer…

Recently, the cultural significance of the emoji has become so pronounced that the Oxford Dictionary Word of 2015 was, in fact, not a word but rather the little yellow “Face with Tears of Joy” (apparently it “best reflected the ethos, mood, and preoccupations of 2015”). Ever atune to the zeitgeist, we enlisted artist James Joyce to interpret some of the most iconic images from AnOther Magazine A/W15, transforming them into emojis of our very own. From Maison Margiela to Prada, John Waters to Aya & Bambi, here we present the most fashionable emojis of all time: our own, chic versions of the little red stilleto and that strange turquoise dress…

To read in full see AnOther

KesselsKramer

James Joyce works this month with Erik Kessels of KesselsKramer Amsterdam to produce a series of iconic graphics for the Press Museum Amsterdam.

James Joyce works this month with Erik Kessels of KesselsKramer Amsterdam, to produce a series of iconic graphics for the Press Museum Amsterdam.

Dismaland

We talk to James about his involvement in Banksy’s Dismaland

We talk to James Joyce about his recent involvement with Banksy’s Dismaland.

Banksy chose to use one of your vibrant recent works as the signature image for Dismaland. Can you tell us more about how this came about?

He got in touch earlier in the year to ask whether I would be up for being in a show he’s planning in the summer. I made a video installation piece for the show and Banksy wanted to use that image on the cover of the programme as for him it summed up the event.

What’s it like seeing your work completely re-positioned like this, from painting to moving image installation to icon for Dismaland?

It’s interesting to see how it can exist on all of those levels, to be a piece of art in the show and as the icon for the event itself. For one of my images to represent such a landmark show is great.

How involved were you in its re-imagination for Dismaland?

It came out of a conversation. Initially Banksy was interested in the paintings, but when we discussed it further we agreed that a rotating piece would be really impactful. I looked into making an actual physical piece where the parts of the face tumbled around as the disc rotates but when I had a test animation made to see how that might work we decided that actually it would look great projected onto a huge circular panel.

Can you explain your working process and materials for ‘Here For A Good Time Not A Long Time?’ – the original painted version?

The original painting is a large circular panel, painted with household gloss paint.

It’s a deeply conflicting image, full of joy and utter despair. What inspired it?

I think originally I did a collapsed clown face a few years ago and then this followed on from that. I think it was just one of those moments that happens sometimes as an artist. It comes from play really, playing with images. I can remember making it, though, and realising it was a really strong image. It’s interesting that such a simple image can be loaded with other deeper associations.

You’re most famous for your graphic works, and the paintings are a continuation of that. Have you always enjoyed the art of painting?

I have, but now it’s taking more of a prominent role than it ever has before, although painting is just one aspect. I’m open to using whatever medium is right for a particular project.

What’s next, James?

This month I have a painting in an exhibition at the Museum of Liverpool. The show is called ‘It’s Glam Up North’ and is curated by Rankin in aid of Claire House Children’s Hospice. I’ve donated a painting titled ‘3 likes’. Following that I’m continuing to work on future art projects.

(Images shown: Perseverance in the Face of Absurdity and the cover visual of the Dismaland programme)

Sunday Times Style

As part of James Joyce’s ongoing series with The Sunday Times Style and 100 Modern Objects, we’ve picked out two to show.

Shown on the 5th July 2015, for The Sunday Times Style, James Joyce creates the iconic Bonne Maman jar, as part of the ‘History of the World in 100 Modern Objects’ series.

Below: The latest modern object from James Joyce, as part of the ‘History of the World in 100 Modern Objects’ series. Sunday Times Style: 31st May 2015 — Mulberry.